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“Napoli, Napoli, Napoli” by Brett Lloyd.
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The facades of dilapidated houses, the sparkle of the Tyrrhenian Sea that creates a light and dark game with the burnt tan of its inhabitants after a very hot summer day, spent on the rocks. This is "Napoli, Napoli, Napoli".

The British photographer dedicates a letter of love and pain to the city of Naples.

This is an image narrative of a summer day spent in Partenope.

Capturing its lyrical beauty, the vibrant and curious glances of its inhabitants, and the latent melancholy.

In July 2010, Brett Lloyd – already knows as a world-famous fashion photographer – is passing through Naples on his way to refined Sorrento. As fate would have it, he misses his train bound for the Amalfi Coast, getting stuck in the city for an entire day. Here, his trained eye for beauty settles on every little detail and, near Garibaldi station, he sets out to find lodging for the night.

His attention focuses on the humanity that populates the narrow streets and alleys of the center, the feverish faces, full of life, love, sadness. He is immediately mesmerized by them.

Since that distant Summer of 2010, Lloyd has spent every summer in the city, often for long periods.

Here, he has collected over the years an anthology – like photographic repertoire, mixing the aesthetics of fashion photos with the anthropological aesthetics of photojournalism. Over the past five years, Lloyd has focused primarily on the various communities that make up the city’s “biodiversity”: elderly fishermen who still go out to sea at 5:00 a.m., to the femminielli who gather outside at the basses of the Quartieri Spagnoli, to the very young who climb the rocks of Mergellina.

Brett Lloyd‘s intent has always been to show another aspect of the city, the one less visible and concealed, often buried by the blanket of crime news and urban decay; to describe, through the all-black-and-white images taken with a Rolleiflex camera from the 1960s, the alchemical meeting of past and present, captivating and vibrant.

Leafing through the book’s 180 pages, it is this timelessness of the shots that is most striking, rooted in the Italian neorealist cinema of which Lloyd is a great admirer.

The facades of dilapidated houses, the sparkle of the Tyrrhenian Sea that creates a light-and-dark game with the burnt tan of its inhabitants after a very hot summer day, spent on the rocks.

Some of Lloyd‘s references are less obvious and more highbrow, such as Goethe’s famous Travels to Italy diaries, to the 19th-century Neapolitan school of painting, one above all, Vincenzo Gemito.

For all those unfamiliar with Naples, the photographer says:

“I want those who see this book to get to the last page, go to Skyscanner and buy a flight to Naples right away. That’s what I want to see happen.”

Brett Lloyd

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