Lo Life. A movement of Lifestyle & Loyalty
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Polo Ralph Lauren’s creative director Ralph Lifshitz was born in the Bronx, and therefore, he was connected to the needs of his neighbourhood. That’s why he always remembered his journey ‘From the hood to the top’ and worked to bring luxury through fashion to the less fortunate.

The glorious origins of the Lo Life Movement

It’s the 80s. In the Bronx, the brand Polo Ralph Lauren has caused a commotion as a new religion was created where hip hop joined fashion, becoming the ghetto’s way of life. This is a journey to the beginning of the Lo Life movement that has gone beyond reaching skateboarding lifestyle brand Supreme in the present.

Polo Ralph Lauren’s creative director Ralph Lifshitz was born in the Bronx, and therefore, he was connected to the needs of his neighbourhood. That’s why he always remembered his journey ‘From the hood to the top’ and worked to bring luxury through fashion to the less fortunate.

Wu-Tang’s songs played everywhere in the 80s Bronx, and the neighbourhood had a lifestyle based on love and loyalty. Hip hop started to make its way through culture and had a great impact on Polo, and this is how the Lo Life movement exploded.

This movement was based on streetwear. It started with sneakers references in an urban context, and after a while, it gained enough attention to finally become a culture. In the meantime, Polo’s crew grew bigger and left the suburbs to expand through the U.S. just like Gucci and Tommy Hilfiger were doing at the time.

Polo adopted colour-blocking designs full of fresh vibes, evoking vintage activewear. This apparel became the symbol of a status that the people from the hood wanted to achieve so desperately, even if they couldn’t afford those clothes. That’s why they would sometimes even steal to get them. It was the presentation letter to the life they wished to have.

Then the 90s came and some popular rappers like Grand Puba brought in lots of attention to the brand, which finally earned some commercial recognition. But the brand’s biggest moment yet came after Raekwon appeared in Wu-Tang‘s video ‘Can It Be All So Simple’ wearing the Snow Beach Polo jacket. That jacket is now part of hip hop’s history and is valued at over $2,000.

The rapper Thristin Howl III also became one of the biggest Lo Life influencers. This collective unleashed the Love & Loyalty principles and brought all kinds of brands to the scene, going far beyond Polo.

As of today, Lo Life has survived and grown stronger thanks to trap, Supreme, the logo hype and the streetwear movements, under the code Money, Hoes & Clothes”. Because Lo Life is alive and kicking.

 

WORDS: Manuela Palma

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